deʒe

v. (st.)

Gaw infin. deʒe; Pe infin. dyʒe, past sg. dyed, dyʒed; Cl infin. dyʒen, dyʒe; Pat diʒe; Erk past 1 sg. deghed; WA infin. die, dee, dyi, pres. 1 sg. dee, dye, die, pres. 3 sg. deis, dies, dyes, pres. pl. dies, imper. pl. dies, past sg. deid, died, dyez, past pl. died, deed, pp. deid

'to die' (Modern English die)

Etymology

Usually derived from ON, cp. OIcel deyja ‘to die’ (str. VI, pret. 3 sg.), reflecting a PGmc *daw-jan- (cp. the wk. verbs OS dōian, OHG touwan; OIcel deyja is also sometimes conjugated wk., with pret. 3 sg. deyði). An OE Angl. cognate *dēgan (WS *dīegan) is possible, but there is no convincing evidence for it (see further Dance) and that a word for such a fundamental concept should first appear in the 12c. (in Bodley 343) is generally regarded as sufficient grounds to give the benefit of the doubt to derivation from Norse.  

PGmc Ancestor

*daw-jan- 

Proposed ON Etymon (OIcel representative)

deyja ‘to die’
(ONP deyja (1) (vb.))

Other Scandinavian Reflexes

Far doggja, Icel deyja, Norw døya, Dan , Sw

OE Cognate

cp. OE dēad 'dead' < *dau-ða-, and dēaþ 'death' < *dau-þuz/*dau-þaz

Phonological and morphological markers

Summary category

C1a

Attestation

The earliest bona fide instances are in Bodley 343 (see DOE, Dance 2000, SPS); thereafter common and widespread in ME.

Occurrences in the Gersum Corpus

Gaw 996, 1163, 2460; Pe 306, 642, 705, etc.; Cl 400, 1329; Pat 488; Erk 246; WA 692, 990, 1033 etc.

Bibliography

MED dīen (v.) , OED die (v.1) , HTOED , Dance deʒe, Bj. 66, 285, DP 12-15, SPS 493–4, de Vries deyja, Mag. deyja, Bj-L dø, Seebold dau-ja-, Orel *ðawjanan, Kroonen *daujan-, AEW dīegan, DOE dēgan